Dynamic Music

Search up Hopkins and you’ll find all things innovative, medicine, and STEM related. It’s unfortunate that our Humanities and Arts departments don’t carry as much weight in the name, because they too are doing incredible and ground-breaking things.

This blog is going to focus on what it means for me to be a music major, and what I’m doing right now in the semester as one.

The idea of music has been a dynamic one for me, and it’s changed dramatically throughout my time here at school. It was something I just merely enjoyed coming into Hopkins and Peabody, but it’s really grown into something else.

Music has become a lot more about others, but a lot more about me too. Allow me to explain.


In my Theory 3 class, we’re currently working on analyzing various Bach Inventions (like this famous one, Bach Invention #1). In class we break down the inventions and analyze the scores, finding musical phrases (named subjects and countersubjects), and see how they permeate through the piece in various forms. We see how simple yet genius these inventions are, and really understand how Bach came up with simple, yet complex-sounding music. We also discuss what makes a piece “Bach”, and what makes it Baroque (an era of Western art music of a particular style).

In this instance, studying music has shown me how meticulous and detailed successful composers from the past were. It’s given me an altered appreciation, and it’s changed the way I listen and receive music, new and old.


Every Thursday, Peabody hosts its Thursday Noon concert series, where the conservatory features an instrumental department with a free concert to the public (like Strings, Winds, Voice, even Computer Music). I went last Thursday with my saxophone professor to see one of my studio mates play. He played a piece by Lori Laitman named I Never Saw Another Butterfly. It’s a heartbreaking piece for saxophone and soprano, where an instrumental melodic line is overlayed onto poetic text. Specifically, the poems are written by Jewish children who lived in concentration camps. It’s so tough to listen to, and the piece really challenges the audience to try and explore their stories.

Here’s the text to one of my favorite movements, III. Birdsong:

He doesn’t know the world at all
Who stays in his nest and doesn’t go out.
He doesn’t know what birds know best
Nor what I want to sing about,
That the world is full of loveliness.

When dewdrops sparkle in the grass
and earth’s aflood with morning light,
A blackbird sings upon a bush
To greet the dawning after night.
Then I know how fine it is to live.

Hey, try to open your heart
To beauty; go to the woods someday
And weave a wreath of memory there.
Then if the tears obscure your way
You’ll know how wonderful it is
To be alive

Being able to explore a work of music with others (my saxophone professor in this instance), means being able to discuss the meaning of a work, why it’s effect is so powerful on an audience, and what the performer did to let us discover and feel particular emotions. After the performance, my professor and I talked about how the composer uses harmony, dissonance, and color to paint music onto text. In this instance, studying music has shown me its raw importance and how it’s a vehicle to explore ideas and experiences. It’s become a lot more about the performer-audience relationship, and why it’s important to think about such things.


These two occurrences are just part of the reason why music is becoming such an integral part of my life. What I love about it is its fluidity and subjectivity – I’m never put into a box of what’s right and wrong. I’m thankful that I’m surrounded by such like-minded people, and shocked even, about what my peers are accomplishing. I love it here, and wouldn’t want to be learning this anywhere else.

Breaking the Fall

I’ve been in Baltimore for the entirety of this semester. Don’t get me wrong, I love it and I call it home, but sometimes you just have to leave and explore a little bit, right?

I think it has to do with constant familiarity of environment and people, and of course midterms too. It’s easy to get bogged down by what you have to do, day in and day out, and it’s hard to take a step back sometimes to realize what you’re after.

I think that’s why it was so nice to change things up for once – this past fall break was an infinitely fun time, and It’s definitely helped to reorient me.

Friday:

After an awesome, intentional sleep-in until 12 PM, I trekked on over to the Peabody campus to meet with my friend, Nick, to work on an arrangement for my a capella group, the Octopodes. We’re working on an arrangement of Contact High – by Allen Stone. It’s a super groovy song, but we’re still in the middle of trying to get the feel of it down. It’s for a winter concert that’s coming up on December 2nd! (I’ll write a blog soon about my a capella group and what arranging is all about, so stay tuned!)

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A snippet of what an arrangement looks like.

After an *intense* buffet session at Akbar, a nearby Indian restaurant in the Mt. Vernon neighborhood, I headed on over to a chamber music rehearsal at Peabody. This semester, my saxophone teacher grouped four of us together and created a saxophone quartet – we’re currently working on a piece called July – by Michael Torke. It plays with so many tonal colors and a really distinct rhythmic groove. We’re planning to go out to nearby coffee shops and local venues to share the piece with others!

Saturday:

If you’re a Hopkins student, you fully take advantage of the fact that D.C. is just a 1 hour, 8 dollar train ride away.

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A picture of the mosaic at Baltimore’s Penn Station!

So that’s exactly what a couple of friends and I did – we took the 11:05 AM MARC train to D.C., and got off at the Rosslyn station stop. Once there, we walked out into a wonderfully sunny day and 15 minutes to a cupcake shop named “Baked and Wired”.

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A guide to my tummy.

Grabbing lunch on the way, we made our way to Six Flags, which is what we’d planned on coming to the D.C. area for previously.

It was absolutely ridiculous – there was a ride where you go on a rollercoaster laying on your back, and when you’re inverted upside down it feels like you’re flying through the air. Another one made use of VR Headsets and a 20-story drop that was pretty other-worldly. Because it’s close to Halloween, Six Flags is currently in its “Fright Fest” mode, where characters in costumes roam around the park and try to scare you when you’re walking from one place to the next. My friends and I got a good laugh out of it afterwards, but navigating through the park truly was frightening. 

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nope nope nope

Sunday:

In Bio lab, we were given an “assignment” to go to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore and take some notes on species and habitats. To be honest, it seems more of an excuse just to go and have some fun, but I’m not complaining.

I’d never been to the Maryland Zoo before, but I enjoyed it a lot more than I expected. The park was pretty full, and there was a lot to do and see.

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Penguin feeding!

Coming back at 4, I went to Octopodes rehearsal, where we were treated to drinks and dessert by one of our member’s family. The rest of rehearsal was pretty typical – we’re currently working on learning a bunch of songs for our concert, like the arrangement I’m working on right now!

 

An action-packed three days of break, I’d say. Now I’m left cramming for all the homework I haven’t done, but I don’t mind one bit.

On Failing A Test

I failed my first Nervous Systems exam.

There. I said it. I’d say there’s no shame in saying it, but oh there’s so much shame in saying it. I’ve never flat out failed a test before, and it pains me to say that I’m a Neuroscience major. I mean, if it were a class I was taking that wasn’t related at all to my course of study, I’d probably just drop the class. But this is Nervous Systems – this is the class of the major, the one class everyone freaks out about and the one everyone studies so extremely hard for. I have to take this class if I want to be a Neuroscience major, and there’s no way around that.

I studied hard for the test. I kept up with my readings, I went to every class, and I studied a considerable amount for the days leading up to the exam. I never wanted to fail (of course, no one does), but yet I did. Maybe I’m not time managing well, or maybe it’s because I’m living in a totally new environment. Maybe it’s all these excuses I’ve come up with in my head, and maybe the reality of it is just that I could’ve studied a lot smarter instead.

Nervous Systems is an amazing class, and no one will contest that. It’s taught by two wonderful professors, Dr. Haiqing Zhao and Dr. Stewart Hendry who pour their heart out into the material they teach. The class is taught in the traditional lecture-style, but the both of them discuss the course material in a very personable and appealing way. It’s an honor being able to learn from such intelligent and humble people.

Zhao and Hendry try their best to let us succeed. The class is very transparent and organized extremely well, and they provide more than enough resources to help us learn the material.

That’s part of why I’m so ashamed and disappointed in myself. I’m in a neuroscience class at Hopkins, where everyone around me is excited and willing to learn material from two of the best professors I’ve ever had, but I still failed the first exam. After I got my grade back, in the midst of being in disbelief, Dr. Hendry sent out an e-mail that really stuck with me:

“Here is a story, a composite in which 4 former Neuro majors are used as exemplars for many others.  Each of these four is currently a medical student earning both an MD and a PhD at one of the best med schools on the planet.  All of you would recognize the names of the med schools and all of you would be ever so happy to trade places with these four.  What they have in common is this: each of them failed the first exam in Nervous System I and all of them went on to earn A’s for this semester and A+’s for the next.  One student stands out because after failing the first Nervous System exam, she missed a total of 5 points for the rest of the year – both NS1 and NS2 combined.  And here is my point: lots of folks go into the first exam without much feel for how well Dr. Zhao and I expect you to understand the material. Now you do appreciate how well we expect you to understand it and I am sure all of you have a much better sense of what it means to really understand it.  If you have any doubts, look at the annotated key and pay particular attention to the answer to question 4. And then appreciate you would need to rent out Shriver Hall to hold all the people who have done poorly on the first exam in Nervous System I and then have gone on to earn A’s in this course and in the one that follows.  If you are disappointed in your score, let me encourage you to fix whatever let you down for this exam, and be another of those who recovered beautifully, so that I can talk about you next year to the next group.”

I’m not used to failing, and I never want to be. I’m not going to say that I’m okay that I completely screwed up the first test, but I’m going to come to terms with it because it’s already happened.

What’s left for me to do is to reset my study habits from the past couple weeks and to start anew. There’s a need for me to not only prove that I can do this to myself, but also to my peers, parents, and teachers too. I want to be able to succeed in an environment like Hopkins, because doing so really means that I’ve learned the material concretely and well. It means I know how to learn, to problem solve, and most importantly to grow.

Here’s to admitting my faults and learning from them. My next Nervous Systems exam is in a week, and I’m going to do everything I can to ace it.

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Research Adventures #2

With the end of the semester in sight, I’m sure everyone feels like everything is crashing down on them all at once – this test, that assignment, figuring out storage, or whatever. I know that for me, these last couple of weeks of school not only mean studying for finals, but also putting on our Spring senior-sendoff show with the Octopodes, finishing our studio album, figuring out last minute Summer plans, and finishing up the music cognition research I’ve been working on all year long.

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science n’ music n’ stuff

Referring back to a previous blog, I had said that I’d keep a record of my research journey for you guys to follow and for me to remember what the process was like – here’s where I’m currently at in the process:

The first research blog talked about what it was like applying and finding opportunities to conduct research in a very general sense. I talked a little bit about the experience of writing a grant proposal and described the sort of research project I wanted to conduct.

Well 4-months later, a lot has changed and even more has happened. My research experience has shaped up to be something I never imagined it to be. It’s been a ridiculously exciting yet sometimes hair-pulling ride, and I’m just getting started. In getting the research grant I had previously applied for, this semester has all been attributed to preparing for it!

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pls give me money

The Proposal

A two-page proposal for a $5000 grant. Done with reasonable procrastination, I managed to create a project with the help of my faculty advisor. In short, the project aims to analyze how prior mental and auditory preparation affects improvisation outcomes. Looking back, the proposal was just the basis for the idea; a lot has changed since actually formulating it.

 

The Celebration

Celebration of getting the grant over dinner and dessert! We went to a restaurant in Mt. Vernon called Maisy’s, and ordered a ton of “fancy” pizza. (Let me just tell you now, try their loaded nachos.)

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The “crap, now we have to actually do this” Meetings

The meetings started off by being a weekly thing; we’d block out a couple hours on the weekend to discuss how we’d create our experiment. I’ve never really done lab-specific research (so I don’t know how much I can speak for it), but doing research from a more musical standpoint while also keeping it scientific is a HUGE challenge I initially overlooked.

Music is such an abstract and subjective idea, while the scientific-method relies more on logic and reproducible testing. In trying to combine the two, there are a lot of blurred lines where we had to try and fit music into numbers. For example, how does one effectively quantify musical results? We could have scorecards and judges, but how much does that limit our data?

In our devised experiment, we plan to analyze music performance components like phrasing of musical lines (sort of like sentences in a spoken language) and articulation (how a musician starts a note), but the musicians have to recreate musical components in pretty uninviting situations. They’re told when to start and stop playing, and are given the limits of what they’re supposed to do. Giving the participant musicians an atmosphere of familiarity was something we tried to recreate too.

More Meetings

Whenever we weren’t working on the protocol/study design, further meetings were dedicated to figuring out recruitment plans and materials. I never realized how specifically clear recruitment processes for research projects had to be. Things like exclusion criteria, cases in which participants might have this health problem are that logistical issue, or interested participants who might not be English-speaking – in many cases you can’t just exclude participants because they don’t fit the ideal subject you’re looking for (otherwise it wouldn’t be scientific, right?).

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who’d ever be this happy reading through tons of applications…

Even More…Meetings

Maybe about a month ago, we ramped up our 1x per meeting to 2x per week to 3x per week. Our goal was to submit our IRB application (Institutional Review Board that determines whether your research project is doable, appropriate, and fits within standards) by the end of the semester (although we had planned to finish maybe 2 months before). The application seemed never-ending, with long open-ended questions going on for 20+ pages – one of the most challenging parts was making sure all our design and logistics were the same across all questions. Working on a response to one question meant having to change small details in many others.

Our application process finally ended just last week which culminated in a final seven-hour meeting. While I understand that the application has to be so detailed and exact, I’m over the moon that that’s over…

The Now

Right now plans are up in the air about when I should come back during the Summer to actually run the experiment (if I do even plan to finish it up this Summer at all). But I guess that’s the nice thing about being able to oversee your own research project; there’s a lot of flexibility in what you want and can do.

With Summer around the corner, there’s still so much to do within these next few weeks. It’s going to be a fun and challenging time, and I can’t wait to do it all.

P1: http://www.austinmusictherapy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Neuroscience-of-music1.jpg

P2: http://cdn.wegotthiscovered.com/wp-content/uploads/PussInBoots1.gif

P3: https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/4c/60/6d/not-yo-mama-nachos.jpg

P4: http://www.irbco.com/slider/images/banner01.jpg

Light City 2016

Baltimore’s own Inner Harbor is an awesome place to be; with a huge variety of restaurants, fun activities, and a killer view, the experience of going is never disappointing,

But imagine going there in the evening hours of the night and seeing the entire Harbor covered in lights, seeing thousands of innovative lit-up sculptures, attending outdoor music concerts, and walking around a familiar place that was made even more beautiful for a week.

Here’s my experience with Light City Baltimore 2016.

Source: Harboreast

Source: Harboreast

The first thing that caught me was the water – as lights lined the edges of the harbor, you could see each of their reflections. The harbor was like rainbow soup (if you will), and the currents kept shifting with colors and intensity. Across the water were mini light-up paper boats, and the background presented a glowing Ferris wheel, carousel, and myriad of other lights.

Voyage by Aether Hemera | Photo by: metroweekly

Voyage by Aether Hemera | Source: metroweekly

The second thing that struck me was the sheer amount of people that attended. Baltimore’s Inner Harbor is pretty well populated on a day-to-day basis, and going at times that aren’t Friday evening or on the weekend allows you to explore even more. Maybe it was the fact that I went on the last weekend of the event, but the Inner Harbor was packed. My friends and I were unable to take the Charm City Circulator (free Baltimore running bus), and had to walk instead (approx. a 10-minute walk from Peabody). There were so, so many people and the sight of them just really added to the experience – people were curious about Light City, liked what they saw and heard, and stayed because of it.

Source: coolprogeny.com

Source: coolprogeny.com

Maybe it’s a bit of a stretch, but in these moments, I felt that Baltimore really felt like a community. It’s easy to stay within the comforts of Hopkins, finding some balance between staying in to study and going out to relax. It’s not hard to get caught up in the “daily grind”, as people call it (heck, we even have an on-campus coffee shop with the name), but Light City was the first time this sense of the entire Baltimore community really struck me. The sheer amount of people was exciting, and I was excited to be a part of it too.

My friend rippin' it on stage! | Source: Symphony One

My friend rippin’ it on stage! | Source: Symphony One

While I only really experienced the visual aspects of Light City, there were so many other components that I didn’t get to explore. In fact, Light City held multiple conferences spread out across days pertaining to social innovation, health, sustainability, and creativity. Leaders and CEO’s around the world came to talk about their ideas of change and innovation, like Reshma Saujani (Founders of Girls Who Code) or Dr. Leana Wen (Baltimore City Health Commissioner). Even the live music being played featured diverse interests like popular music, funk, jazz, cultural, and classical – my senior friend actually performed live too!

Light City didn’t feel so much like an event, but more like a platform to share human experiences. It felt like an excuse to get out of familiarity, and instead experience amazing, almost uncomfortably-wild feelings.

Until next year!

“I Played Myself”

One of my instructors, Prof. Dungey, from my oral presentations course said something that really struck me today – I’m fortunate enough to be in a place where people would give almost anything to be where I am, and that I got here by mostly doing what I was told.

And I guess that’s just how the system works; in going from middle school to high school to college, we absorb information, regurgitate it, and then are rewarded for how well we can replicate. We prepare tirelessly for the SAT’s and ACT’s, and maybe fit in a couple of activities that interest us, but don’t have much passion for. Advisors tell us to do this and this and that, but also ironically not to work ourselves too hard.

I’m confused right now – as a friend puts it, it seems like this semester “I’ve played myself”. I’ve taken on way too many credits (30, actually) to spend enough time I want to spend on each activity I’m taking part in. I feel like there have been too many long nights staring passively at heaps of text, and too many worries that prevent me from really focusing on one thing. Even when trying to spend time with friends here and back at home, I feel like more often than not, I have to apologize for missing out.

I don’t feel invested; I don’t feel like I’m learning as much as I can be. I took on this much because I feel like I have to and because I should.

But what sort of reason is that?

I dipped my feet into so many classes and activities because they interested me (and sometimes I think about joining even more), but then again, lots of things interest me.

So yes, this semester, I feel like I’ve played myself.

Hopkins prides itself on being an opportunity hub, and rightfully so. But the biggest challenge in coming here (and I’m sure in many college settings) has been maintaining focus. The amount of high-quality opportunities I can partake in are infinite, and I so badly want to try it all – but I can’t.

I think that’s what my professor was so expressively ranting about last lecture; I’m so very lucky to be here because of the opportunities present and the opportunities to come. I’m able to learn about wondrous and complex things through the lens of knowledgeable people with opinions and ideas frighteningly different than mine. I need to stop feeling like I have to do all these things that’ll seemingly place me somewhere ‘safe’ in the real world, because frankly, some of these things aren’t me. Instead, I should be investing my time in classes and activities I really, really, really want to take, and explore them rather than do them.

I’m lucky to be here, and I’m here to learn as much as I can. Thank you, Mr. Dungey, for making me realize that.

 

ICCA 2016

A thousand spectators, commanding lights, and the sounds of emotion in my ears.

Yesterday night, Johns Hopkins hosted an ICCA Mid-Atlantic Quarterfinal, an event run by Varsity Vocals that brings a capella groups from around the region to show off 12-minute “sets”. A group’s set typically consists of three songs – each with a soloist, vocal percussion, bass, and backing vocals. In this quarterfinal, ten groups competed for two spots that would bring them to the Semi-final competition at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia.

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Cred: PhillyMag

We weren’t supposed to perform until much later that night, maybe 9 or 10 O’clock. All of the groups met earlier at 1:30 for a quick debrief/informational meeting, and then let go to do whatever they wanted until it was time to perform. After a short sound check at our assigned time, we headed back to polish and shape-up portions of our set. We changed into our outfits, and nervously (yet hopefully) talked about our would-be performance. Everyone felt tense, yet immensely proud of what was to come.

Performing with the JHU Octopodes last night was something else – it was the result of countless hours and days of repeated rehearsals, all culminating in a final musical presentation. To be honest, the performance itself was such a blur; I only vividly remember the moment when we finished our set. Maybe it’s because we ran through it so many times, or maybe it was just the adrenaline taking over.

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Cred: Cindy Jiang

When the judges announced that our group had won first, the experience was nothing short of awesome. With everyone screaming and jumping all at once, I managed to capture snapshots of tears and joy of my friends despite all the frenzy. We even had some individual recognition in which some of our members won awards for best vocal percussion (Gabriel) and best song arrangement for the entire set (Joe and Katrina). Still shocked from the moment, we were asked to perform an encore song – something we definitely weren’t ready for (but it happened anyways).

As one of two teams competing in the Semifinals in Philadelphia, we have about a month to polish/change any part of our set. At Semifinals, my group (along with JHU_Joanna!) will be competing for the top spot which will take us to the ICCA Finals competition in New York (and once there, we’re also going to be featured on the Netflix series, Sing it On!). I don’t think I’m able to post any part of our set until we’re finished competing, so make sure to come out and watch us perform on March 26th!

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Cred: Cindy Jiang

What I’m learning: Cognitive Neuroscience

Curious about the thumbnail? Read on!

I never knew what being a “neuroscience” major really meant when I came to Hopkins. I mean as a high school student I never studied the brain or the nervous system, and I guess being a “neuroscience” major sounded well, cool.

Only since coming here have I realized how valuable and intriguing studying neuroscience, especially at a place like Johns Hopkins, really is. Having basically chosen the major on a whim, the classes I’ve taken here and the people I’ve spoken to have only helped to further compel me into the major. They tell me their undergraduate education at Hopkins has more than prepared them for graduate school and jobs in a real world setting.

I’ve been told that the Hopkins undergraduate neuroscience program is so special because it really integrates neuroscience-specific classes for its undergraduates. Believe it or not, most universities don’t have neuroscience majors take major-specific classes until they’re juniors or seniors; many colleges don’t have a neuroscience program at all. On top of that, many of my friends and peers partake in neuro-related research with graduate, PhD students, and renowned faculty. So many students are able to find a plethora of opportunities because research labs are so welcoming of undergraduates and because there are so many resources nearby.

As a freshman, I’ve already taken three classes related to my major. This spring semester, I’m taking a class called Cognitive Neuroscience, and it’s by far the coolest class I’ve ever taken.

This year, the organization of the course is different than it’s ever been – students watch lecture material and do readings on their own time, then go to class twice a week. On one day, students go to small group “Active Learning” sessions of 10-15 students for material reinforcement and group problem solving. On the other day of the week, teaching assistants hold optional lecture review sessions where students are able to relearn material or ask further questions. The instructors formatted the class in a way that really encourages students to take their time to learn the material, and I think it speaks a lot towards how the Hopkins’ neuroscience program treats their students!

In the three weeks of class I’ve been in, we’ve already covered a variety of topics:

  1. Learn neuroanatomy and general brain functions
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The software we use!

 

With the use of brain imaging software, we can look at different cross-sections of the brain to locate specific brain regions. We’re also using the imaging software to view lesions and neurodegenerative diseases!

  1. Different neuroimaging methods
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wow science

We’ve analyzed various brain imaging methods such as fMRI, EEG, MEG and weighed the pros and cons of each.

  1. Studied various aspects of the Vision System
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Now, look at the picture upside down!

Besides learning the anatomy of the vision system, we’ve learned about how it works in relation to our cortices and the workings of optical illusions and why we perceive them in certain ways.

Throughout the rest of the semester, whether it be learning about the auditory/olfactory/gustatory systems, listening to guest lecturers come in and speak, or reviewing cross-sections of brain slices, I know that Hopkins will be providing me with a particularly unique and relevant education that’s hard to find anywhere else.

 

 

 

Intershenanigans

Tomorrow the spring semester will start and everything will be familiar and different again.

These past three weeks of Intersession have been some of the most fulfilling and exhilarating times –  I’d even say these weeks have made up my favorite Hopkins experience so far. It’s nice not being in the midst of the typical daily grind; I’ve had a lot of time to reflect on how the past semester went, and to also re-align my interests for the next one.

I think it has to do with being at school, but not doing school – whether it be actually taking my time to enjoy the campus (instead of having to rush to class) or having an infinite block of time to sit and enjoy dinner with friends (rather than having to leave to finish homework), Intersession gives the student body a totally different vibe.

For the sake of having a diary of my favorite Intersession experiences (and to show off all the “cool” things I did), here’s what happened:

  1. Recorded an album with the JHU Octopodes

Two weeks into Intersession I headed up to Rochester, NY with my favorite acapella group to record an 8-track album for a couple of days. It was (for lack of putting it a better way) pretty insane to have the experience of tracking covers and original arrangements in a professional setting (thanks SledDog Studios!). I got to see all the ins and outs of the recording process all while being in the company of some of my best friends.

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The studio we recorded at!

  1. Held a dinner party for 15 people

In my dorm at Peabody, the kitchen is pretty out of the way and really isn’t used that often. With all the more time on my hands, Intersession has instilled in me the courage to cook for the first time at college. I was originally just going to cook for myself and one other, but my entire floor caught drift and I ended up cooking for everyone.

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  1. Learned the principles of musical conducting

Because Peabody is on a different academic schedule than Hopkins, I’ve had some of my music classes already start. One of my favorites is Conducting with Prof. Adam Waller, probably because it’s such an out of the box class. We’re always on our feet, twirling our arms around in fantastic and crazy patterns.

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Somewhere along the lines of what we do…

  1. Took courses about Vaccines and Ion Channels

Arguably the reason why I did Intersession in the first place are the two Hopkins classes I took: Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future & Ions in Flux: From DNA to Disease. With professors teaching a very specific topic they’re knowledgeable and passionate about, taking academic classes during Intersession has been surprisingly refreshing. Of course the lack of homework might just be something that adds to the feeling…

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Science n’ stuff.

  1. Discovered the brilliance of the game: Bananagram

Held in a banana-shaped sack of frustration and glory, the game Banangrams has got to be one of my greatest discoveries this Intersession. I’ve played countless games, again and again, with friends and strangers alike. (@JHU_Joanna –  I’ll beat you eventually)

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It’s a love-hate relationship.

  1. Actually read 2 books from cover to cover

I can’t remember the last time I read a book for fun; I’ve always only read assigned readings for classwork and homework. I realize I’ve forgotten how relaxing it is to sit down in the cozy warmth of a coffee shop and read at whatever pace I want. I ended up doing this so often this Intersession that I blasted through two (pretty hefty) books: Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer and Wolf in White Van by John Darnielle. (I strongly recommended both of them!)

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  1. Had not 1, but 15 movie nights

I’m not even going to explain this because I’m ashamed at how much entertainment I’ve watched these past few weeks. (What I watched: Nightcrawler, Grave of the Fireflies, Silver Linings Playbook, The Cobbler, Meet the Fockers, Howl’s Moving Castle, Hot Fuzz, Snowpiercer, Lord of the Rings Trilogy, Rain Man, Black Hawk Down, Bad Teacher, Kill Bill. This doesn’t include the however many hours of TV watched…)

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Absolutely cry-worthy.

  1. EXPERIENCED SNOW FOR THE FIRST TIME

I’m from California. Just look at this picture – you’ll understand.

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Picture Credits:

Picture #1 – http://www.thevocalcompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/sds-studio-empty.jpg

#3 – http://www.allthingsstrings.com/var/ezwebin_site/storage/images/media/images/nezet_marco_borggrreve_/1860175-1-eng-US/Nezet_Marco_Borggrreve__xlarge.jpg

#4 – http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v449/n7162/images/449545a-f1.2.jpg

#5 – http://www.thetoyinsider.com/wp/wp-

#6 – http://also.kottke.org/misc/images/wolf-in-white-van.jpg

#7 – http://s4.photobucket.com/user/paradorlounge/media/foer.jpg.html

#8 – http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71qMlebtjuL._SL1280_.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sax

Whenever I tell people the instrument I play, they automatically assume I do jazz. It makes sense, the saxophone can be heard throughout all jazz styles of ragtime, bebop, swing, and others. Jazz is an awesome style of music, but it isn’t what I primarily study at Peabody.

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Bill Clinton played the sax?!

The classical saxophone studio at Peabody consists of about 15 undergraduate and graduate students, all taught under Prof. Gary Louie. While the saxophone isn’t a regular part of symphonic orchestra (you can find it in military/wind bands), there’s still a lot of classical repertoire out there for us saxophonists to play.

Sometimes it almost feels weird playing the saxophone from a classical standpoint, especially because there’s this overwhelming notion that the instrument is for jazz purposes only. There’s also the fact that the saxophone was invented too late for many of the well known symphonic works (yes, I’ll always be sour about that). But I think that the saxophone holds a special place in classical music because of its relative rarity – the tone and sound of the instrument is distinctively melancholy yet filled with so much power and clarity. (See the end of this blog post for some pieces I’m working on!)

Because there are such few classical saxophonists out there (compared to other classical instruments), we’re able to create our own special niches in the classical world through solo performing, small chamber music groups, premiering new works and compositions, teaching, and other unique ways. Being a classical saxophonist is about going against the grain of what it means to be a classical musician, but also embodying every aspect of what a classical musician should be.

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Our beloved Peabody Wind Ensemble (PWE)

After a semester of living at Peabody (the music conservatory campus), I’m grown to better understand what it means to be a musician. In the presence of extremely talented, hilarious, and inspiring teachers (I promise I’ll interview some of them someday!) and peers, I’ve come to really love what I’m doing here at school. Bring on the music!


 

As promised above, my “homework” for saxophone lessons. Take a listen to the types of pieces I’m working on! 

Solo repertoire work:

Sonata for Alto Saxophone, Op. 19 by Paul Creston – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLaJHdbhqZI

Tableaux de Provence by Paul Maurice – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrykcPOEWRs

Wind Ensemble pieces:

Roman Carnival Overture, Op. 9 by Hector Berlioz – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJ_KlnQaOc4

Hold this Boy and Listen by Carter Pann – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_Fw_ov-KKk

Four Scottish Dances, Op.59 by Malcolm Arnold – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7XcYCh2vzw

A Child’s Garden of Dreams by David Maslanka – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCZdgrTCR6s