Monthly Archives: November 2016

Food for Thought

An aficionado for words and phrases, I keep with me a book – a pride possession, frankly – where I jot down novel words that I encounter throughout the day, phrases that I want to hold on to, and puny one liners that fulfill my daily dose of cringeworthy angst. To me, collecting these forms of expression (most of which happen in passing) has always had an empowering and cathartic element to it. With every additional word, the arsenal of phrases within the book becomes thicker with emotions and, in fact, forms something of its own character. This book holds within its layers of papers, in between each line, the values that I uphold, the the the dreams that i have for the future, the poignant sweet spots of my soul, the motivation behind my actions, sobering wisdom of aphorisms, and the ideas that I fail to express with my own words. Unfortunately, as with most unrequited love, words never seem to reciprocate the same feelings I do: I am neither an eloquent writer nor a silver-tongued elocutionist. I stumble with my words when someone challenges me against my idea, and I take an absurdly long time reading. This oil and water relationship between words and me has been rather a bane than a boon, especially in a college setting where mastering self-expression is deemed to be the holy grail of many students. Though frustrating at times, this chasm lying between us continues a drive, a crave for words that I don’t want to ever satiate. 

On that note, and with thanksgiving looming, I’d take this time to express my gratitude for those around me by sharing with you the joy and knowledge they’ve given me through these soundbites:

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

306401_1754734688175_977555_n1. “Seek out what magnifies your spirit – It’s a beautiful phrase and a beautiful notion. Who are the people, ideas, and books that magnify your spirit? Find them, hold on to them, and visit them often. Use them not only as a remedy once spiritual malaise has already infected your vitality but as a vaccine administered while you are healthy to protect your radiance.”

2. “Presence is far more intricate and rewarding an art than productivity. Ours is a culture that measures our worth as human beings by our efficiency, our earnings, our ability to perform this or that. The cult of productivity has its place, but worshipping at its altar daily robs us of the very capacity for joy and wonder that makes life worth living – for as Annie Dilalrd memorably put it, “how we spend our days is, of course, who we spend our lives.’”

3. “There’s a creative purpose to daydreaming, even to boredom. The best ideas come to us when we stop actively try to coax the muse into manifesting and let the fragments of experience float around our unconscious mind in order to click into new combinations. “1148842_4717885045082_845984708_n

4. “Be as religious and disciplined about your sleep as you are about your work. We tend to wear our ability to get by on little sleep as some sort of badge of honor that validates our work ethic. But what it really is is a profound failure of self-respect and of priorities. What could possibly be more important than your health and your sanity, from which all else springs?”

5. “No regrets… sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.”

6. “Bernstein’s greatest point of enthusiasm was his lifelong devotion to enamoring young people with music. He understood that love and learning are inextricably linked, that learning is a kind of love and love a kind of learning, and he used his robust and radiant enthusiasm as a force of illumination.

A Day in a Life

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Nabbing a seat at Carma’s cafe in the morning since class is canceled!

9:30am: On a typical Monday, I attempt to wake up 30 minutes before my class starts..only to hit the snooze button 5 times before I’m physically out of bed.

9:45am: I stare at the pile of clothes on the beanbag chair in a groggy haze and decide to grab the first clothes that I see on top of the heap to slip into. This beginning-of-November weather has been very fickle lately so my wardrobe has been all over the place with its seasons.

10:00am: My first Monday class is Introduction to Developmental Psychology, taught by Lisa Feignson. This class is well known to be a very all-encompassing class that uncovers the age-old debate of nature and nurture on the topic of our psycho-social development from day 1 in this world. Learning about copious amounts of previous experimental studies on child development, the class tracks how our constantly changing environment turns on/off our given genetic blueprint and how the two interact in morphing us into the beings we are today. Although the coursework is not too loaded, the course material is

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The only order I get from Brody Cafe: Vanilla Latte

robustly built around her lectures so it’s crucial to attend class because a) the bulk of the midterms are contingent upon her lecture info and b) her lectures are not a resource available online.

 

10:50am: End of class (a.k.a. time for food). I usually head to Levering to grab a quick meal because it’s the closest to my class but these days, I have been gravitating towards deli sandwiches at CharMar more frequently to satisfy my voracious appetite.

11:40am: After a full meal, I mosey on over to the Brody Café to whet my whistle with a vanilla latte and use this layover time in between classes to complete small busy tasks, like replying back to emails and making appointments. Fun fact about Brody Café: if you’re lucky and talk to the right baristas, they will give you a free drink on your birthday!

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Oh Gilman 🙂

1:15pm: For my next class, I tend to go a little bit earlier just because I love the walk to Gilman. This time of the day is when the sun shining on the quad in front of the Gilman and it’s a placid walk to one of my favorite buildings on campus.

1:30pm: My next seminar class is called Illusion of Perception, in which we learn about the daunting yet fascinating notion that what we see and feel may not actually be the truth. This class explores the countless failures of the brain to truly represent the reality that is presented before us – to some which may seem as a curse but to others a blessing.

2:45pm: After class, I catch myself popping in my earphones and putting my Apple Music on random to hear a new song on my way to my next class.

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What’s currently on my playlist right now

 

 

3:00pm: My last class of the day is Introduction to Computing. In this class, we learn a variety of new programing languages like UNIX, Python, MATLAB, R, etc. As it is my first programming class, the fast paced class has thrown me off my guard multiple times but I find this class very useful and helpful in adding more flavor to my skill sets.


4:00pm:
Once class ends, I head back to my dorm to have a post-hoc hang out sesh with my roommates and watch an episode of How I Met Your Mother. After two consecutive class, I run out of gas and need to decompress, which is what my lovable roomies (Sarah, Indira, and Yasmin) provide.

 

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The squad


5:30pm:
As my stomach starts orchestrating its own symphony of hunger, I usually meet up with my boyfriend to grab dinner. We wrestle with the dilemma of choosing our platter for quite a while but our choices often range from Potbelly, UberEats, Nolan’s, to home-cooked Asian food.

 

7:00pm: Upon our return from our dining, we head to the library to study. We love the atrium and the reading room because of its openness and the comfortable chatter noise in the backdrop of the area. As several articles like this one (http://99u.com/articles/17437/the-perfect-workspace-according-to-science) cited, having high ceilings is optimal to a workplace and the atrium & reading room satisfy that preference.

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Pork Back Bone soup made by Chef Yao

8:30pm: This is the time when I try to be the most flexible in my schedule because most of my extracurricular set meetings around this time.

10:00pm: Starting right about 10 pm, my circadian rhythm begins its usual signaling of its zoning in and focusing. Around 10pm ~ 1am is my prime time when I work most productively and most efficiently. Though, every day I try my best to stop measuring my days by degree of productivity and start experiencing them by degree of presence.

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Studying at home sweet home

 

2:00am: By the end of my study time, I head to bed by 2:00am and usually fall asleep after a good thirty minutes. Sleep and I have had an oil and water relationship: we never really reconciled.
It creeps up on me during the daytime in class while it never allows me to peacefully rest at night. Hopefully, this will change after the midterms week subsides.